Browsing Category

CISL San Diego

Career English CISL San Diego Social Media Student Articles

Career English Student Success: Hyebin’s Talent Scout and Marketing Experience!

May 5, 2017

CISL’s Career English program allows international students to master English skills and then spend time with an American company. Our student Hyebin recently completed the Career English course by spending time with Gaslamp Event Management, a marketing company that also is a talent management company for models. Hyebin provided us with some information about her experience with the Career English program and her time with GEM.

Hyebin remembers the interviews before her placement. “I had two interviews. One was for B Green Foods and the other was for GEM.” She says that she “searched about the companies in advance,” but of course she was anxious! Hyebin remembers that “it was my first job interview, so I was nervous, but both were casual interviews, so it was comfortable for me.”

In the end, Hyebin’s chose Gaslamp Event Management, a company located downtown just five minutes from the CISL campus.

What did she do each day? “At first, I made tickets which were for Saint Patrick’s Day. After preparing tickets for 1 week, I sold them on Saint Patrick’s Day. There was a booth in front of a bar, so it was good for meeting a lot of customers.”

What an awesome opportunity to speak English with native English speakers!

Hyebin’s responsibilities also included working with models. “My CE placement was also a model agency, so I was a talent scout & manager. Every day, I received a lot of application letters and I invited them to our interview. In addition, I was in charge of Downtown Dolls’ social media marketing.” She states that “experiencing many tasks was good for me. As I mentioned, I was a talent scout & manager, so I had to respond to application letters so it was good for improving my writing skills . . . I managed Downtown Dolls’ official website and social media sites. I could do a real social media marketing.”

When looking back on her experience, Hyebin is very pleased. “My boss and colleagues were friendly. I was the only one who couldn’t speak English fluently. Every time when I didn’t understand what they were saying to me, they told me again and helped me. They encouraged me and I could work happily. I was satisfied with my CE program.”

Would Hyebin recommend this program to others? Absolutely! She says “I would recommend CISL’s Career English program to potential students who want to experience real tasks at a company. You can learn English and experience many things and meet nice people. It will definitely be worth it.”

Thank you for sharing your experiences with us, Hyebin! We are so happy that you enjoyed your time at your company and that your English improved!

California Life CISL San Diego Featured Idioms and expressions San Diego San Diego Travel Tips

English Expressions with “Warm” + San Diego’s (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

April 18, 2017

San Diego is warm nearly all year, but as the temperatures increase, we are reminded just how perfect the SD weather is! This month we are looking at some expressions with “warm” to celebrate the coming of summer. We are also looking at San Diego’s yearly weather temperature averages to show SD’s ideal weather.

Expressions with “Warm”

English Expressions with Warm

Housewarming (party)

Definition: a party to celebrate when someone moves into a new apartment or house.

Example: Are you going to Sarah’s housewarming party? She just moved to a new place in Little Italy!

We can also use housewarming + gift/present to talk about the present we give someone at a housewarming party.

Example: I bought her a new cheese plate as a housewarming gift.

Warm body

Definition: any person; someone needed to be present in order to be counted.

Example: The movie director needed a few warm bodies for the scene, so he asked the people at the beach if they wanted to be in the movie.

Warm the bench/bench warmer

Definition: to be a part of the team but not play.

Example: He warmed the bench for most of the game.

We also can the person who warms the bench a “bench warmer.”

Example: I played baseball when I was young, but I was not very good. In fact, I was a bench warmer most of the time.

Warm regards

Definition: a polite way to end an email or letter.

Example: Warm regards, Sarah

For examples of ways to begin emails or letters, check out our article on Beginning an Email in English.

Warm up to (someone/something)

Definition: to begin liking someone or something when you didn’t at first.

Example: He’s warming up to the idea of getting a dog.

Warm welcome

Definition: greeting someone; being very happy to see him or her.

Example: What a warm welcome from my host family! They had a big BBQ for me and I got to meet all of my neighbors.

English Expressions with Warm

San Diego’s (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

How good is the weather in SD? It’s pretty amazing! Holiday Weather provides excellent statistics on the yearly temperature averages for San Diego. Let’s take a look at the temps on land and in the water.

While the rest of the Northern Hemisphere is freezing in the winter, San Diego is enjoying not only warm temperatures, but many sunny days; it’s not uncommon for people to be at the beach several weekends during January and February!

San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

In this chart, we can see the average high and low temperatures. San Diego stays consistently warm in the winter months, so although you need a jacket at night, it doesn’t have to be a huge parka!

San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

The Pacific Ocean gets significantly warmer in the summer months, but with a wet suit, San Diego’s surfers are in the water all year.

San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

To see more statistics about the San Diego weather, check out Holiday-Weather.com.

CISL San Diego CISL San Francisco Featured Vocabulary

Phrasal Verbs for the ESL classroom

February 7, 2017

Phrasal verbs are an important part of the English language, and we find them used in the business setting, while using public transportation, when talking about love, and–you guessed it–in the classroom! Academia is common place for phrasal verbs: read on to learn more about phrasal verbs for the ESL classroom!

Phrasal Verbs ESL classroom

Phrasal verbs for the ESL classroom

Some of these phrasal verbs have more than one meaning. In this case, we are looking at the definition that is used with the context of an ESL class.

Catch on

Meaning: to understand a concept.

Examples:

  • Your CAE Speaking score has really improved. It seems like you’re really catching on!
  • It was difficult at first to learn a new trolley route when I arrived in SD, however, after two weeks I’ve caught on.

Note: this phrasal verb is intransitive (it does not require/take an object). To learn more about intransitive vs. transitive phrasal verbs, check out our article on Grammar Lesson of the Month on phrasal verbs. 

Hand out

Meaning: to distribute (usually papers).

Examples:

  • The teacher handed out the test to everyone and then we began taking it.
  • Before my presentation, I handed an outline out to each classmate.

Note: this phrasal verb is transitive (it takes an object) and hence is optionally separable. The second example shows how you can separate this phrasal verb. 

Phrasal Verbs ESL classroom

Hand in/Turn in

Meaning: to submit (usually papers/homework).

Examples:

  • We all handed in our tests before we left for the day.
  • Did you hand  your homework in so I can correct it?
  • I forgot to turn in my essay! Hopefully I can email it to my teacher.
  • Did you turn your paper in?

Note: this phrasal verb is transitive (it takes an object) and hence is optionally separable. The second and fourth examples show how you can separate this phrasal verb. 

Make up

Meaning: to do at a later date than originally planned.

Examples:

  • I was sick on Monday, so I made up my test on Tuesday.
  • You cannot make the CAE up; therefore, it’s important that I don’t miss my test!

Note: this phrasal verb is transitive (it takes an object) and is optionally separable. The second example shows how you can separate this phrasal verb. 

Pass out

Meaning: to distribute (similar to “hand out”).

Examples:

  • She passed out our new EAP books today and I think they’re great!
  • My classmate passed candy out to each of us after his presentation. They were chocolates from his hometown.

Note: this phrasal verb is transitive (it takes an object) and is optionally separable. The second example shows how you can separate this phrasal verb. 

Student.Question.Class.Teacher.FAQ,Phrasal Verb

Speak up

Meaning: to say your opinion.

Examples:

  • If anyone doesn’t understand, please speak up.
  • Which beach should we go to after class? Someone speak up!

Note: this phrasal verb is intransitive (it does not require/take an object).

Business English Career English CISL San Diego CISL San Francisco Featured Vocabulary

Sales Vocabulary + CISL’s Career English Program

January 24, 2017

CISL is proud to offer students the Career English program, where students master business English and communication skills before spending time in an American company. Past students have experienced architecture, marketing, event planning, and even real estate through CISL!

One of the most requested areas of interest for students is sales and marketing. Do you know these common sales and marketing related terms and expressions?

WorkBusinessOfficeChartMeetingProfessionalTech

Sales and Marketing Vocabulary

Cold call

Definition: (verb, noun) to call a person or company that you do not have relations in hope of beginning a new business relationship.

Example: We estimate that 70% of our cold calls are not successful . . . but 30% are!

Example: The first time I cold called someone when I was at my host company, I was so nervous! But my English got better each time I did.

Conduct (research)

Meaning: (collocation) to do research (on the market, customers, competitors, etc.)

Example: We conducted extensive research before choosing our logo.

To close (a deal/sale)

Meaning: (verb) to finalize an agreement or sale.

Example: After closing the deal, we celebrated with a little champagne!

Meeting.Work.Business.Internship.CareerEnglish

Follow up

Meaning: (phrasal verb) to make contact with someone after a meeting.

Example: He made a follow up call to see if they were still interested in the product.

Implement

Meaning: (verb) to begin something, to put a plan into effect.

Example: They implemented their new marketing plan in January 2017.

Intern.Presentation.Present.Internship.Work.Business.Study

Innovative

Meaning: (adjective) original, advanced (ideas, plans, etc.)

Example: Her innovative marketing plan led to her promotion.

Lead

Meaning: (noun) a tip; a potential client or sale.

Example: I have three leads to look into today.

Optimize

Meaning: (verb) to make something better; reach its potential.

Example: After optimizing the website, we saw sales increase by 15%.

Money.Save.Finance.Business.Bank

Profitability

Meaning: (adjective) the ability to make money/be profitable.

Example: They were worried about the profitability of the new product, but in the end it was incredibly successful.

ROI

Meaning: (phrase, acronym) “return on investment.”

Example: The ROI on social media marketing is becoming easier to track.

Strategic

Meaning: (adjective) carefully planned; with purpose.

Example: They asked us to design a strategic sales plan . . . in two hours!

For more information on CISL’s Career English, contact the CISL Career English Coordinator.

Business English Career English CISL San Diego English for Engineers Featured Vocabulary

English for Engineers: Vocabulary for Dimensions

January 14, 2017

Tech.Study.School.Lab.Technology.Engineering

English is quickly becoming the language of engineering, which is why CISL now offers the English for Engineers program. With this program, Upper Intermediate and Advanced students learn the skills necessary to help them succeed in an English speaking Engineering environment. Among other things, students learn:

  • Language related to engineering (such as design, procedures, and processes)
  • How to express problems, solutions, and communication related to capabilities, limitations, problems, solutions, regulations, standards, etc.
  • Practice working with written instructions, drawings, and notices
  • Grammar, vocabulary, and writing and speaking skills focused on discussing quality, repairs, maintenance, technical requirements, regulations, standards, suitability and relative performance

Finally, students learn vocabulary about engineering and technology, such as dimensions, precision, and causes and effects. The CISL Blog has already looked at Five must-know English Adjectives for Engineers. Today we are taking a look at some college Engineering vocabulary regarding the dimensions of an object. Do you know all of these words?

Engineering Vocabulary: Dimensions

Area

The measurement of a surface or piece of land.

Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-area-skateboard-parkinglot-city

Which is more difficult: calculating the area of a square parking lot . . . or skateboarding?

Breadth/width

The distance or measurement from side to side of something

Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-river-valley-nature

The width of the river changes during different parts of the year.

Circumference

The distance around something

Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-mathematics-circle-cone-cylinder-calculations

Which of these can you calculate the circumference of?

Depth

The distance from the top or surface to the bottom of something

Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-ocean-deep-depth

The depth of the ocean scares many people . . . but not surfers!

Diameter

A straight line passing from side to side through the centre of a body or figure, especially a circle or sphere.

Flat

Having a level surface; without raised areas or indentation

Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-flat-tree-nature

This flat land is perfect for playing sports, running, or biking.

Height

The measurement of someone or something from head to foot or from base to top.
Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-height-skyscraper-city

It’s amazing to think of the height of these large skyscrapers.

Length

The measurement or extent of something from end to end; the greater of two or the greatest of three dimensions of an object.

ruler-Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-ruler-length

Radius

A straight line from the centre to the circumference of a circle or sphere.
Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-radius-mathematics

Remember high school math?

Thickness

The distance through an object, as distinct from width or height.
Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-book

Have you ever read a really thick book?

Volume

The amount of space that a substance or object occupies, or that is enclosed within a container.
Engineering-vocabulary-dimensions-sea-ship-sail-water-sunset-clouds

Is it possible to calculate the volume of the ocean?

For more information on CISL’s English for Engineers (and to learn more about the Career English program, where you can spend time in an American Engineering firm!) contact CISL.