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Academic English Celebrities EAP Featured University Pathway Vocabulary

Meet our CISL Pathway Partner, New York Film Academy! (+10 Movie-related Vocabulary Words)

March 24, 2017

Do you dream of a life making movies . . . in English? CISL’s Pathway Program + New York Film Academy might be for you!

New York Film Academy 10 movie-related vocabulary words

With CISL’s Academic Pathways Program, students attend CISL (including the afternoon English for Academic Purposes course) to improve their English skills. Students then choose a CISL Pathway Partner school to attend: at this college or university, students receive a post-secondary degree (associate’s, bachelor’s, or master’s). With CISL Pathway Partners, international students do not need to take the TOEFL exam: students who pass the EAP course automatically meet the requirements for admission!

New York Film Academy 10 movie-related vocabulary words

Happy graduates!

Students at the New York Film Academy have many location options for studies: the school has campuses in New York, Los Angeles, and Miami. The New York Film Academy uses the educational philosophy of “learning by doing,” which allows students hands-on experience with their field. Students graduate ready to enter the world of cinema and use their degree: in the first year alone, each student writes, shoots, directs and edits eight films!

The list of degrees is long for potential NYFA students. The school offers an “accelerated three-year Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree programs in Filmmaking, Acting for Film, Producing, Screenwriting, 3D Animation, Graphic Design, and Game Design. Students also have the option of a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Media Studies.” Phew! NYFA additionally has a “two-year Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree in Filmmaking, Acting for Film, Screenwriting, Producing, Cinematography, Documentary, Game Design and Photography, and two-year Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) degrees in Filmmaking, Acting for Film, Producing, Screenwriting and Game Design, and a Master of Arts (MA) in Film and Media Production at the Los Angeles campus.”

New York Film Academy 10 movie-related vocabulary words

The beautiful New York campus on a snowy winter day.

While receiving their degree, students have access to the NYFA’s incredible events, which often include informal talks by industry professionals. Kevin Spacey, Glenn Close, Bryan Cranston, Jamie Lee Curtis, and many more have visited the NYFA to speak to its students!

New York Film Academy 10 movie-related vocabulary words
For more information on attending NYFA through CISL, contact Converse International School of Languages.

Movie Industry Vocabulary

Before starting your academic career with NYFA, make sure you know these industry-related words! These terms all come from the International Movie Database. Check out the entire (lengthy) list of terms online!

New York Film Academy 10 movie-related vocabulary words

B-Movie

A low-budget, second tier movie, frequently the 2nd movie in a double-feature billing. B-films were cheaper for studios because they did not involve the most highly paid actors or costly sets, and were popular with theater owners because they were less expensive to bring into their theaters while still able to draw revenue.

Back lot/Backlot

A large, undeveloped area on studio property used for constructing large open-air sets or for filming wilderness scenes.

Director’s Cut

Contracts under the terms of the Hollywood Director’s Guild usually allow 6 weeks for a director to assemble a cut of the movie without studio interference as he or she would like it to be seen. This director’s cut is fully edited and has a synchronized soundtrack. This cut is usually not color corrected or density corrected and may not even have the final music and effects tracks. In more recent times the term Director’s Cut has taken on a popular meaning that implies a polished final cut of the movie that the director has complete artistic control over.

Layout Artist

A person responsible for staging every shot and plotting the action that will take place within each scene, whether it be live action or CGI-based.

Magic hour

The minutes just around sunset and sunrise, where light levels change drastically and quickly, lending a warm orange glow to earlier shots, and a clearer blue in later minutes that allows a crew to shoot night scenes while light still remains.

Scenic Artist

A member of the crew responsible for work which includes the preparation, painting and/or coloration of all textures, plastering, appliqueing on scenery, sets, and properties; the application of all decorative wall or surface coverings; all lettering and sign work (including signs and murals; miniature sets and/or models and properties and the painting and aging in the (construction) studio or on the set of costumes and costume accessories as specified by the costume designer.

Screen Actors Guild

An association with jurisdiction over some works that can be recorded by picture or by sound.

Walla

Background conversation. Historically, when a script called for “crowd unrest” or “murmuring”, the extras would be required to mumble the word “rhubarb”, as this produced the required effect.

Working Title

The name by which a movie is known while it is being made. This is sometimes different from the title with which it is released.

Wrap

To finish shooting, either for the day or the entire production.

All NYFA photos from NYFA’s Facebook page. Director’s cut photo is from Pixabay.  

Academic English EAP Featured TOEFL University Pathway Vocabulary Writing

Academic English Vocabulary: Verbs for Citations

March 14, 2017

When CISL English for Academic Purposes students learn to write academic English research papers, students often have difficulty citing their sources. The problem? Finding synonyms for the word “say” in order to avoid repetition in their paper. The following verbs for citations can be used in place of “say.” Some are more appropriate than others depending on the situation: to better understand their usage, we are providing the situation in which we can use this word (as well as an example, which uses the MLA format for citing sources).

With each example, we are imagining a research paper written on the effects of caffeine. We will cite an imaginary scientist with the last name “Jacobs.”

Verbs for citations

Verbs for Citations

Argue

Usage: to cite a person who says something contrary to another argument.

Example: While many believe caffeine is harmful, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania argue that in small doses, caffeine can stimulate brain function and awareness (Jacobs 2017). 

Assert

Usage: to cite a person who says something confidently or with force.

Example: Despite arguments against the validity of his research, the professor asserts that the study’s findings are accurate (Jacobs 2017). 

Claim

Usage: to cite someone who is stating or asserting that something is the case, typically without providing evidence or proof.

Example: The anti-environment group claimed that research about global warming was flawed (Jacobs 2017). 

Disclose

Usage: to cite someone who is making (secret or new information) known.

Example: Jacobs disclosed that the research was funded by a pharmaceutical company with the intention of making their new drug appear effective (199: 2017).

Divulge

Usage: to make private or sensitive information known.

Example: The summary divulged that the study was funded by the government (Jacobs 2017). 

Verbs for citations

Maintain

Usage: to cite a person who keeps their opinion, despite claims against it.

Example: Although over the years other studies have been published stating the dangers of caffeine, Jacobs maintains that the original study is correct and that caffeine in small doses is beneficial (199: 2017). 

Note

Usage: to cite a person who is pointing out something interesting, adding a fact or piece of information.

Example: Jacobs additionally notes that caffeine has been shown to help maintain steady sleep patterns when used effectively (198: 2017). 

Point out

Usage: the phrasal verb “to point out” means to bring attention to an important fact.

Example: Jacobs also points out that many of the studies regarding the benefits of caffeine were paid for by the coffee industry, while his study was funded by a government grant (198: 2017). 

Reason

Usage: to cite a person who draws a conclusion based on information, evidence, or knowledge.

Example: Scientists reasoned that the study’s results were due to the use of regulated doses of coffee, as opposed to studies that gave subjects higher doses of caffeine (Jacobs 2017). 

State

Usage: a more formal synonym for the word “say.”

Example: Jacobs also states that the study was the first of its kind (194: 2017). 

Did you notice that each of the above words are followed by the word “that?” This is optional. To find out why, read our article on Defining vs. Non-defining Relative Clauses.

Would you like some more examples of verbs for citations? Check out the University of Toronto, Scarborough’s list of Verbs for Citing Sources, the University of Portsmouth’s Verbs for Citations list, or Centralia College in Washington’s useful Verbs of Attribution download.

Academic English California Life EAP Featured University Pathway

No TOEFL? No Problem! Meet CISL’s Pathway Partner, Santa Barbara Community College!

January 30, 2017

Meet our Pathway Partner, Santa Barbara City College!

SBCC-Santa-Barbara-City-College-International-Student-Transfer

If you’re a CISL student who would like to continue your education in the U.S. after you graduate from CISL, consider our Pathway Program as an option! CISL partners with incredible colleges to ensure a smooth transition for students moving from CISL to American college. One of our partners, Santa Barbara City College, was voted the #1 Community College in the U.S.! Life in beautiful Santa Barbara, a campus just steps from the beach, and an affordable education? SBCC is an excellent choice!

SBCC-Santa-Barbara-City-College-International-Student-Transfer

Santa Barbara City College

In addition to being one of the top-ranked community colleges in the nation, SBCC is known for its incredible International Student Support Program, which provides multiple resources for the international student. The school also has excellent degree completion and transfer rates to some of the most desired universities in California. And did we mention that it’s just steps from the beach?

SBCC-Santa-Barbara-City-College-International-Student-Transfer

SBCC has Guaranteed Transfer Agreement Programs in many area of study, including:

  • Administration of Justice
  • Anthropology
  • Business Administration
  • Communication Studies
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Economics
  • Elementary Teacher Education
  • English
  • Geography
  • Geology
  • History
  • Journalism
  • Kinesiology
  • Mathematics
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

That means that students studying these subjects are guaranteed admission to a four-year university!

SBCC-Santa-Barbara-City-College-International-Student-Transfer

Some other benefits of attending Santa Barbara City College? The international student population is thriving, and students receive impressive resources from the school in regard to admissions, academic counseling, and transfer guidance. In the classroom, students meet dedicated and passionate teachers and motivated students.

SBCC-Santa-Barbara-City-College-International-Student-Transfer

Plus, the facilities are state-of-the-art! This Humanities building is an impressive and modern structure; additionally, because the campus itself is the old University of California, Santa Barbara campus, it boasts beautiful Spanish architecture.

SBCC-Santa-Barbara-City-College-International-Student-Transfer

For more information on how to attend Santa Barbara City College (without taking the TOEFL or IELTS!) contact CISL and ask about our Pathway Program.

Academic English EAP Featured San Diego University Pathway

Meet our Pathway Partner, American Aviation Academy!

December 29, 2016

With CISL’s Pathway Program, students can attend an American college or university. In addition to having agreements with traditional schools, such a Palomar College, CISL is also partnered with vocational schools such as American Aviation Academy. After studying at CISL and completing our English for Academic Purposes course, students can get their pilot’s license in sunny San Diego with AAA’s incredible program!

aaa_logo

To learn more, we met with Marion Froehlich, who is the International Student Advisor in the Admissions Department at the American Aviation Academy. Thanks for answering some of our questions, Marion!

American Aviation Academy

How long have you been working with your school? 15 monthsmarion

What are some of your job duties? I issue I-20s, conduct orientations for new international students where I explain their obligations as M-1 students in the U.S., help students apply for Extension of Stay, assist students in applying to transfer to our flight school and to change their non-immigrant status from F-1 to M-1, if applicable.

Your school has many international students. What are some countries you have had students from? Korea, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, Bangladesh, Turkey, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Chile, Mexico, Mongolia, UAE, Egypt, Qatar, Angola, Kenya, Canada

What is one student service that international students often use? (Tutoring, housing, etc.) We provide housing in apartments in shared or private rooms. Flight instructors will meet one-on-one with students as necessary.

Fly.Airplane.Aviation.Plane.Sky

What is one academic program that your school is really proud of? Our Commercial Pilot License training.

At what part of campus do students usually hang out? Study room, lobby, picnic tables outside. There is a deli on the premises.

What’s one thing that makes your school unique? We are one of four flight schools in the U.S. that provides EASA (European Aviation Safety Agency) training.

What’s one piece of advice you have for a student transferring to your school? If you are committed to completing your flight training goals and apply yourself, you can complete your Commercial Pilot License within one year. Private Pilot License training takes less time.

Thanks to Marion for providing AAA students with a positive learning environment and the chance to reach their academic goals in the U.S.! To learn more about studying at American Aviation Academy after learning English at CISL, contact the Pathway Coordinator

 

Academic English Cambridge Exams EAP Featured IELTS TOEFL Writing

Exam Prep Writing: Beginning an Essay with an Effective Hook

December 16, 2016

Many writers (both native English speakers and English learners) agree that beginning the essay is often the most difficult part. For English proficiency exams such as TOEFL, IELTS, and Cambridge FCE and CAE, this is certainly the case!

Take a look at this sample TOEFL Agree/Disagree statement. How would you begin an essay? (For tips on TOEFL Agree/Disagree, check out our article that contains useful hints.)

Writing.Speaking.Agree.Disagree.TOEFL.CAE.FCE.IELTS

Learn more TOEFL Writing Tips (and how to construct an Agree/Disagree essay) on the CISL Blog.

Writing Prompt:

Do you agree or disagree with the statement below?

There is nothing that younger people can teach older people. 

Use specific examples to support your arguments. 

Would you know how to begin an essay on this topic? Learn how to write a great “hook” (first sentence) and you will not have this problem again!

Students Writing

A strongly written essay will also include conjunctions: learn about how to use them effectively in our article about Coordinating Conjunctions.

Using the hook in writing

A “hook” is given its name because it hooks the reader. It’s the first sentence, and it entices the reader to continue through the paragraph and essay.

There are many types of hooks. Let’s look at a few.

Hook 1: A Question

Begin your essay by posing a question to your reader. It gets them thinking!

Example 1: Have you ever had a teacher who was younger than you?

Example 2: We become wiser as we get older . . . but can we learn from those who have experienced less of life?

Example 3: Have you ever had a teacher who was younger than you?

Hook 2: An anecdote

An anecdote is a personal story. Writing sections of proficiency exams ask you to use specific examples to support your opinion: with an anecdote, you are beginning with one!

Example 1: I will never forget walking into the classroom and seeing Vlad: even with his kind face, I thought to myself, “How can I teach someone who is significantly older than me?.” It turns out, I could.

Example 2: I’ve learned so much from my teachers and professors in elementary school, high school, and college . . . but I may have learned the most from my experience as teaching assistant to small children.

Example 3: Can the students be the teacher? I certainly think so after volunteering at a local elementary school.

Hook 3: A fact

In a test setting, it might be difficult to remember an exact fact or statistic. However, this is useful if you are writing research essays at home and can access a library or a computer. Even without a computer, this can still be a possible hook: check out some of these examples.

Example 1: You must complete four years of college and two years of additional training to become a high school teacher.

Example 2: Most companies ask for “2-5 years experience” from applicants.

CAEwritingtipsCAEclassSanDiego

Familiarize yourself with the many prompts you can get in TOEFL with our article on the Types of TOEFL Writing Prompts.

Hook 4: Set a scene

Grab their attention: tell a story! The reader will continue reading just to hear your ending!

Example 1: Jason watched as George slowly typed on the computer keyboard, carefully pushing one key at a time while looking confused and dismayed. “Can I help you?” Jason asked. “Sure,” George replied. “I’m trying to email my daughter a photo, but I don’t know how to attach it. This email thing is so confusing to me.”

Example 2: Looking around the classroom, Anna completed her lecture. “And that is how you publish your own webpage. Any questions?” A student in the back, a middle-aged gentleman with wire-rimmed glasses, raised his hand. “Just one question,” he said. “How did you learn all of this before learning how to drive?” The class laughed, and so did Anna. “Well,” Anna said, “I studied programming in high school and was well-versed in coding before I entered college last year.”

Hook 5: A quote

Without access to a computer, it might be difficult to remember exact quotes from famous individuals. However, your quote does not have to be from someone famous.

Example: “Yoga until you’re 90,” Sindhu kept saying during our yoga teacher training. With this in mind, we learned the best ways to practice yoga without putting strain on our bodies. Little did I know, in a few months my students would actually be near 90: I was soon to take a volunteer position as a yoga teacher for a retirement community in my town.

Hook 6: Your thesis!

Your thesis is the main idea of your paper. If you don’t feel like writing a catchy or creative hook, then begin your paper with your thesis. This direct approach is often very effective!

To write a powerful and concise thesis, check out our article on How to Write a Thesis with Predictors.

Example 1: I am a firm believer that everyone has something to offer, regardless of age; therefore, it is my opinion that the young have much to offer the elderly in regard to education.

Student Studying Writing Computer

Do you know how to write a thesis? Check out our article Writing a Thesis with Predictors for tips!

Hook 7: A misconception

Example 1: Many believe that the youth of today are misguided, self-centered, and irresponsible, and therefore have little to offer in regard to educating the wiser elderly population.

For more information on CISL’s intensive TOEFL, IELTS, and Cambridge CAE and FCE classes, check out CISL’s website.