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Golf Expressions in English

April 9, 2018

Golf Expressions in English

Do you love to golf? This sport is incredibly popular in English, so it is not surprising that there are many golf expressions in English. How many of these have you heard?

English also uses many expressions from other sports: read our Sports Related Idioms for more information!

Golf Expressions in English

Above/below par

Golf definition: “Par” is the number of attempts a player should make before putting the ball in the hole. (It can also be used for  many rounds of golf or for entire tournaments.) To be “above par” means that it took the player more attempts than “normal”; to be “below par” is the opposite.

English definition: Better or worse than average.

Example: Your writing and vocabulary skills are above par, but we need to work on your pronunciation.

Not up to par

English definition: Not as good as something should be; below average.

Example: I’m worried that my skiing is not up to par with my friends. We will see this weekend when we go to Big Bear!

Hole in one

Golf definition: Hitting the ball into the hole in one attempt. 

English definition: A successful attempt at something.

Example: Your presentation was a hole in one. Excellent job.

On par with

English definition: To be at the same level as something or someone else.

Example: My running isn’t on par with Silvia’s, so it’s difficult to exercise with her.

Par for the course

English definition: Typical.

Example: Spending 2-3 hours on social media each day is par for the course these days.

Tee up

Golf definition: To get ready to hit the ball; to put the ball on the tee (the small wooden piece that goes into the ground).

English definition: Prepare something; make detailed arrangements.

Example: The children are teeing up for their annual spring concert.

Golf Expressions in English

CISL San Diego organizes private or group golf lessons for students upon request. The lessons, which are either 30 minutes or one hour, are organized at one of the four beautiful golf courses in San Diego (La Jolla, Coronado, Balboa Park, or Fashion Valley). The lessons include equipment. For more information, contact the CISL Activities Coordinator at sdactivities (at) cisl (dot) edu.

CISL San Diego Featured San Diego San Diego Travel Tips Voices of CISL

Meet our Japanese Liaison, Joseph!

March 21, 2018

Did you know that CISL has a Japanese Liaison? CISL staff member Joseph is Japanese and lived in Japan for more than 25 years. Now, we are lucky to have him as CISL’s Assistant Academic Manager and official Japanese Liaison.

We interviewed Joseph to learn more about his life, his Japanese family, and his job at CISL.

Meet our Japanese Liaison, Joseph!

CISL: Tell us about your time in Japan and how you learned to speak Japanese. 

Joseph: I grew up in Japan, mostly in Okinawa.  I have family there (my mother is Okinawan).  I lived in Japan for over 25 years before moving to the United States.  Since we spoke English in our house, I mostly used Japanese to communicate with my relatives in Japan.

I went to school on the American military bases, so I was educated in English.  I did study Japanese in middle school and high school as well as college.

 

CISL: What are your credentials and experience teaching?  

Joseph: I have been ESL teaching for 17 years.  I taught in Japan for 8 years.  I have taught in various schools in Tokyo, Chiba, and Okinawa, from languages schools, to special education and a high school (as well as at some companies)

 

CISL: What is your position at CISL and what do your responsibilities include?

Joseph: I am the Assistant Academic Manager.  I oversee the teachers as well as the students in the school.  I help the students if they have questions about their classes or would like to try another one.

I also am the Japanese Student Liaison, so if a Japanese student has difficulty understanding in English, I can explain to them in Japanese.  I also teach the FCE course and have been teaching it for 8 years.

 

CISL: Why would you suggest that students choose San Diego? What is one thing that surprises students about SD/Southern California?

Joseph: San Diego, like the rest of Southern California, is known for its weather and its beaches.  It has a mild climate so it never gets too hot or too cold.  There are a lot of activities which can be done in San Diego, such as surfing, hiking in the mountains or desert, skydiving…..you can even go skiing in the winter!

 

CISL: What is one tip you have for new students?

Joseph: The best thing to do is to immerse yourself in English.  It is the best way to learn.  Talk to people.  If you only converse in the classroom, it will be challenging to speak to native English speakers.  Do as much reading and listening as possible.  Even from watching TV, you can improve  your listening skills and learn new vocabulary.  Reading can help to understand not just vocabulary but sentence structure and paragraphing.

 

CISL: What CISL program excites you the most, and why?

Joseph: For me, it is definitely the Cambridge program!  As I have said, I have been teaching FCE for 8 years and I haven’t gotten sick of it yet!  You can learn a lot in a short period of time, and it is always nice to see the improvements the students have made as they go through the course.

 

CISL: What is a misconception about life in the U.S. that many Japanese students have?

Joseph: I don’t think  I would call it a misconception, but I don’t think a lot of Japanese don’t realize just how diverse the United States actually is.  Different regions have their own dialects and cultures (much like Japan).  Sometimes going to another state is like going to another country.

 

CISL: What’s one thing that students must do when in SD?

Joseph: Everyone knows to go to the beaches here, so checking out hiking trails such as those in Mission Trails Regional Park is worth the effort to see the natural beauty of San Diego.

 

Thank you for taking time to give our students some tips, Joseph! And thank you for all the work that you do for CISL students. You are such a wonderful addition to our school!

California Life Featured Grammar Lessons San Diego San Diego Travel Tips

“SO” + Adverbs and Adjectives (+ Things that are “SO” San Diego)

November 1, 2017

In the English language, we use the word “so” in several different ways. Each way allows us to speak with more emphasis; some uses of the word “so”  are more typically “Southern Californian” than others. Learn the most common ways of using the word “so” here!

“SO” + Adverbs and Adjectives (and Things that are “so” San Diego)

“So” means several things in English.

“To such a great extent”

In this meaning, “so” is an adverb that shows the degree (level) of an adjective or adverb.

  • Why are you so angry? (This person isn’t a little angry: he is very angry.)
  • I didn’t realize the car was parked so far away. (The person is surprised that the distance is very far.)
  • Why are you speaking so slowly?
  • My presentation didn’t go so well.

“Very, very”

In this meaning, “so” is an intensifier. It intensifies (gives more meaning to) the adverb or adjective it is modifying.

In these cases, we can switch the word “so” with the word “very.” The meanings seem the same, but “so” is more intense than the word “very.”

  • You are so beautiful.
  • Thank you so much!
  • That was so thoughtful of you.

“So” + ADJECTIVE/ADVERB + THAT

We often use the construction SO + ADJECTIVE/ADVERB + THAT to show the effect of something.

  • He was so tired that he fell asleep while eating his ice cream.
  • I was so upset that I threw my shoe.
  • She was so tall that none of the pants in the store could fit her.

Slang: “so” for a characteristic

With this meaning, “so” is used to show that something or someone is the perfect example of another thing. For example, if someone’s name is Summer, and she lives in San Diego and goes surfing every morning, she is SO Californian!

  • My friend Jane is the perfect student. One day after the teacher gave us our assignment, she completed it! That’s SO Jane.
  • We went surfing, ate a burrito, and then watched the sunset. Today was SO Southern California.
  • With that shirt and those cowboy boots, you look SO country.
  • This sushi roll has avocado and cilantro. It’s SO Californian.

Things that are “so” San Diego

Fish tacos

Yes, tacos with fish. Or lobster. Or scallops! With its close proximity to Mexico, it’s no surprise that California food is influenced by typically Mexican spices and flavors. Since San Diego is on the beach, it’s also no surprise that the local food includes a lot of seafood! While in San Diego, be sure to try fish tacos. In most places, you can order the fish grilled or fried. The toppings will vary at each restaurant, but many include avocado or guacamole, salsa, and cabbage.

Seafood + Mexican food? SO San Diego!

ComicCon

The craziest and most exciting week in San Diego is ComicCon week! Every July, celebrities and comic book fans come to the city’s Convention Center for a crazy week of events, shows, and exhibits. It’s the perfect time to walk around Downtown San Diego and see all of the costumes. Be on the lookout for celebrities as well: you never know who you are going to see!

ComicCon? SO San Diego!

Slomo

Go to Mission and Pacific Beaches and most days you will see Slomo: a man on rollerblades who rides up and down the beach boardwalk for hours. Slomo is a staple of the city, and he is now famous throughout the nation: the New York Times made a video about him! Slomo is actually a doctor who retired in order to pursue real happiness. He found it . . . on the beaches of San Diego!

The happiest person alive is a doctor-turned-rollerblader? SO San Diego!

Surfboard museum in a taco shop

A taco shop in Pacific Beach isn’t just a taco shop: it’s also a museum that pays tribute to Southern California’s surf culture! In 1989, Cindy and Sam McLarty opened Taco Surf, a surf shop that displays more than 90 surfboards.

Is there anything more “San Diego” than a surf museum in a taco shop? Nope! SO San Diego.

 

California Life CISL San Diego Featured Idioms and expressions San Diego San Diego Travel Tips

English Expressions with “Warm” + San Diego’s (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

April 18, 2017

English Expressions with "Warm" + San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

San Diego is warm nearly all year, but as the temperatures increase, we are reminded just how perfect the SD weather is! This month we are looking at some expressions with “warm” to celebrate the coming of summer. We are also looking at San Diego’s weather temperature averages throughout the year to show how ideal the SD weather is . . . from January to December!

Expressions with “Warm”

Housewarming (party)

Definition: a party to celebrate when someone moves into a new apartment or house.

Example: Are you going to Sarah’s housewarming party? She just moved to a new place in Little Italy!

We can also use housewarming + gift/present to talk about the present we give someone at a housewarming party.

Example: I bought her a new cheese plate as a housewarming gift.

Warm body

Definition: any person; someone needed to be present in order to be counted.

Example: The director needed a few warm bodies for the scene, so he asked the people at the beach if they wanted to be in the movie.

Warm the bench/bench warmer

Definition: to be a part of the team but not play.

Example: He warmed the bench for most of the game.

We also call the person who warms the bench a “bench warmer.”

Example: I played baseball when I was young, but I was not very good. In fact, I was a bench warmer most of the time.

Warm regards

Definition: a polite way to end an email or letter.

Example:

Warm regards,

Sarah

For examples of ways to begin emails or letters, check out our article on Beginning an Email in English.

Warm up to (someone/something)

Definition: to begin liking someone or something when you didn’t at first.

Example: He’s warming up to the idea of getting a dog.

Warm welcome

Definition: greeting someone; being very happy to see him or her.

Example: What a warm welcome from my host family! They had a big BBQ for me and I got to meet all of my neighbors.

English Expressions with "Warm" + San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

San Diego’s (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

How good is the weather in SD? It’s pretty amazing! Holiday Weather provides excellent statistics on the average monthly temperatures for San Diego. While the rest of the Northern Hemisphere is freezing in the winter, San Diego is enjoying not only warm temperatures, but many sunny days; it’s not uncommon for people to be at the beach several weekends during January and February!

English Expressions with "Warm" + San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

In the chart below, we can see the average high and low temperatures. San Diego stays consistently warm in the winter months, so although you need a jacket at night, it doesn’t have to be a huge parka!

San English Expressions with "Warm" + San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

The Pacific Ocean gets significantly warmer in the summer months, but with a wet suit, San Diego’s surfers can be in the water all year.

English Expressions with "Warm" + San Diego's (Very Warm!) Yearly Weather Averages

To see more statistics about the San Diego weather, check out Holiday-Weather.com.

Since 1972, CISL has provided students with quality English instruction in the small classroom setting (never more than 8 students per class)! Learn more about CISL’s San Francisco and San Diego locations (and its many programs, including Executive English, Cambridge CAE and FCE, and Career English) by visiting the CISL website

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YouTube Vocabulary + Awesome Videos of SD

January 24, 2017

We can’t hide our excitement for San Diego. The stunning beaches, the sunny skies, the gorgeous Downtown, the trendy neighborhoods and the charming seaside towns . . . there’s a little of everything for everyone in SD! Just when we think we can’t get any more excited, we see beautiful footage of San Diego on YouTube, and we fall in love with the city a little more!

Have you seen these great videos of San Diego on YouTube? Check them out, and also check out some of the YouTube-related vocabulary that we’ve added. Be sure to change your language on YouTube (and social media sites, like Facebook and Instagram) to English so that you are constantly connecting with English!

Videos of San Diego

YouTube Vocabulary

Channel

Meaning: the account that of the person/company on YouTube

Example: She started her YouTube channel four years ago.

Example: Is there a YouTube channel about learning English that you recommend?

Example: Have you seen CISL’s YouTube channel?

To post (a video)

Meaning: to publish a video online. Synonyms include to publish, to upload.

Example: They post a new video each week.

Followers

Meaning: the people who receive notifications when a new

Example: The account has over 100,000 followers.

To gain/lose followers

Meaning: to have an increase or decrease in followers.

Example: She gained 20,000 followers after her video went viral!

To go viral

Meaning: to become popular/receive a lot of views

Example: After the video went viral, he gained a lot more followers.

Hits

Meaning: views

Example: How many hits does your newest video have?

Subscribe

Meaning: to receive updates (similar to “follow”)

Example: Subscribe to my channel for updates!

Subscribers (subs)

Meaning: the people who subscribe to a channel

Example: Do you know a way to get more subs?